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The left column is primarily security update information and updates about operating systems and manufacturers are in the right column. In the center column, you'll find more general news from sources such as Wired, TechCruch, Computerworld, and such.

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General Interest Tech News

Top Stories from Wired

Next List 2017: 20 People Who Are Creating the Future

Next List 2017: 20 People Who Are Creating the Future
You might not recognize their names—they're too busy working to court the spotlight—but you'll soon hear about them a lot. They represent what's next. The post Next List 2017: 20 People Who Are Creating the Future appeared first on WIRED.

Uber Didn’t Track Users Who Deleted the App, But It Still Broke the Rules

Uber Didn’t Track Users Who Deleted the App, But It Still Broke the Rules
Uber took a known industry practice and managed to turn it into something deeply suspicious. The post Uber Didn't Track Users Who Deleted the App, But It Still Broke the Rules appeared first on WIRED.

TechCrunch Gadgets

Crunch Report | Uber Responds to iPhone Tracking Report

Crunch Report April 24 Today’s Stories  Uber responds to report that it tracked devices after its app was deleted LinkedIn hits 500M member milestone for its social network for the working world Amazon’s driverless tech team focuses not on building it, but on how to use it DJI’s new FPV goggles let you control your drone with head movements The NYT brings its news – and a mini crossword… Read More

Juicero may be the absurd avatar of Silicon Valley hubris, but boy is it well-engineered

 The Juicero story is a funny one in some ways and a sad one in others, so let’s just assume they cancel each other out and admire the machine itself in a nice judgment-free moral vacuum. Read More

DJI’s new FPV goggles let you control your drone with head movements

 When DJI announced the Mavic Pro last year they also teased a pair of FPV goggles that could be used to see first-person video from DJI’s drones. But we didn’t get many more details than that… until now. Read More

Computerworld

How NASA's A.I. moonshots idea could help your enterprise

Every few weeks, a group at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., finds an empty conference room where the participants sit down to talk about how they can use artificial intelligence to make what might seem like crazy ideas a reality.

This is the JPL's informal A.I. moonshots group.

The group isn't talking about the moon, but is taking ideas that might seem like science fiction and figuring out how to use artificial intelligence to make them work.

These A.I. experts are focused on efforts such as sending small submarines to search for life beneath the oceans of one of Jupiter's moons and flying an autonomous spacecraft on a 100-year trip to another star system.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CEOs rate productivity 'very low' from emerging tech

The internet of things, artificial intelligence, blockchain and 3D printing promise to improve productivity on a grand scale for enterprises, cities and other organizations.

Even so, CEOs and other senior enterprise managers rate such breakthrough technologies "very low" in terms of productivity improvement in the next five years, according to a new Gartner survey of 388 senior executives. But it may be too early in the game to fully appreciate the potential benefits of these technologies, Gartner suggested.

"There seems to be a big, unexplored future," said Gartner analyst Mark Raskino in a summary of the survey released Monday. "That [future] amounts to a leapfrog opportunity for a new generation of brave and creative business technology thinkers."

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Russian man receives longest-ever prison sentence in the U.S. for hacking

A 32-year-old Russian hacker was sentenced to 27 years in prison in the U.S. for stealing millions of payment card details from businesses by infecting their point-of-sale systems with malware.

The sentence is the longest ever handed out in the U.S. for computer crimes, surpassing the 20-year jail term imposed on American hacker and former U.S. Secret Service informant Albert Gonzalez in 2010 for similar credit card theft activities.

Roman Valeryevich Seleznev, a Russian citizen from Vladivostok, was sentenced Friday in the Western District of Washington after he was found guilty in August of 10 counts of wire fraud, eight counts of intentional damage to a protected computer, nine counts of obtaining information from a protected computer, nine counts of possession of 15 or more unauthorized access devices and two counts of aggravated identity theft.

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There's now a tool to test for NSA spyware

Has your computer been infected with a suspected NSA spying implant? A security researcher has come up with a free tool that can tell.

Luke Jennings of security firm Countercept wrote a script in response to last week’s high-profile leak of cyberweapons that some researchers believe are from the National Security Agency. It's designed to detect an implant called Doublepulsar, which is delivered by many of the Windows-based exploits found in the leak and can be used to load other malware.

The script, which requires some programming skill to use, is available for download on GitHub.

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Apple's Mac Pro gets crushed by new HP Zbook laptops

Apple's Mac Pro has been ignored for so long that even Windows 10 mobile workstations are catching up on features and performance.

Take HP's latest Zbook laptop workstations , which were announced on Friday. These heavy built laptops -- which is why they are called mobile workstations -- have comparable memory and storage capacity technology to the Mac Pro, but excel in other areas.

The laptops feature Thunderbolt 3 ports, DDR4 memory, Intel's latest Kaby Lake-based Core and Xeon processors, and the latest GPUs from Nvidia and AMD.

By comparison the Mac Pro has Thunderbolt 2 ports, an old AMD GPU, DDR3 memory and Intel Xeon processors based on the Ivy Bridge architecture, which were released in 2013.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tech Republic Small-Medium Businesses

Google launches free Optimize A/B testing tool for SMBs

Google's new tool runs on top of Google Analytics to allow small businesses to test and experiment with multiple versions of their company website.

How to calculate depreciation on computer hardware: The smart person's guide

This resource guide explains what hardware depreciation is, how it works, and how to apply it in your small or medium-size business.

NethServer 7: Major improvements make choosing this server a no-brainer for SMBs

With the significant security and networking advances in NethServer 7, Jack Wallen believes SMBs should add this budget-friendly open source server to their hardware shopping lists.

Is Linksys Velop mesh network a smart buy for your small business?

If your small business or home office suffers from wireless dead spots, you might consider a mesh networking device. Meet one of the new players in that realm: Linksys Velop.

How to add a cloud-based document app on Nextcloud

If you want to add document editing capabilities to your Nextcloud server, learn how to do so with the help of the Documents app.